Baker Hot Springs


A Hidden Oasis Tucked Deep
in the Utah Desert

Baker Hot Springs

Baker Hot Springs


A Hidden Oasis Tucked Deep in the Utah Desert

In need of an escape from the early 2014 snowpack, or rather, lack there of, we packed up the truck on a bluebird Sunday afternoon and hit the road looking for some hot water. What we found was a hidden oasis tucked away in Utah’s West Desert. For anyone experienced in chasing desert sunsets, or watching ridgelines disappear in your rear-view, the adventure from civilization is well worth the trip to Baker Hot Springs. While not as picturesque as Diamond Fork or Meadow, the springs’ remote location offers a more secluded setting. Unlike other Utah hot springs, there’s a good chance you’ll have the place to yourself.

The Baker Hot Springs were formed and are still fed by the 6 million year old shield volcano known as Fumarole Butte. Aside from the Intermountain Power Plant, which is operated by and supplies power to the city of Los Angeles, you’re a solid 50 miles from anything resembling civilization. To the south is the community of Delta which is one of the few sources in the world for concentrated beryllium, a highly-toxic metal used in aerospace and military grade technology. Additionally, during World War II, the Topaz Relocation Camp was located near the town of Delta. The camp detained over 10,000 Japanese Americans throughout the war.

In need of an escape from the early 2014 snowpack, or rather, lack there of, we packed up the truck on a bluebird Sunday afternoon and hit the road looking for some hot water. What we found was a hidden oasis tucked away in Utah’s West Desert. For anyone experienced in chasing desert sunsets, or watching ridgelines disappear in your rear-view, the adventure from civilization is well worth the trip to Baker Hot Springs. While not as picturesque as Diamond Fork or Meadow, the springs’ remote location offers a more secluded setting. Unlike other Utah hot springs, there’s a good chance you’ll have the place to yourself.

The Baker Hot Springs were formed and are still fed by the 6 million year old shield volcano known as Fumarole Butte. Aside from the Intermountain Power Plant, which is operated by and supplies power to the city of Los Angeles, you’re a solid 50 miles from anything resembling civilization. To the south is the community of Delta which is one of the few sources in the world for concentrated beryllium, a highly-toxic metal used in aerospace and military grade technology. Additionally, during World War II, the Topaz Relocation Camp was located near the town of Delta. The camp detained over 10,000 Japanese Americans throughout the war.

Intermountain Power Plant
Desert Mountain
Baker Hot Springs

Baker Hot Springs consists of three concrete tubs which are located roughly 100 yards downstream from the source. The water is heated by active magna not far below the surface, and are some of the hottest springs in Utah earning them the moniker of “mini-Yellowstone,” albeit the emphasis is on “mini”. Nevertheless, they are certainly worth checking out, and are a unique desert oasis. According to some colorful locals we happened upon, the concrete tubs were originally constructed by a few industrious pioneers in the 1920’s who had ambitions of creating a desert health retreat. Suffice to say, it never quite took off. However, the fruits of their labor remain for all to enjoy, whether you’re an underage kid trying to get weird, or a seasoned adventurer looking to soothe the soul.

Baker Hot Springs - Tavertine
Baker Hot Springs - Tavertine

Above: Among other minerals and metals present in the water, the springs have a high concentration of colloidal gold and silver. The travertine that forms as a result along the channel takes on some fascinating forms.

Below: Pictured below is the source of the springs as well as the channel that feeds the springs to the tubs. Keep a close eye on your dogs or children if they venture upstream as this water is extremely hot and could easily burn or scald.

Baker Hot Springs
Baker Hot Springs

Baker Hot Springs provide a secluded and unique setting for those looking for a mildly adventurous day trip. Word to the wise, travel with ample supplies and don’t push the low fuel light as it could be a long walk back to civilization for help if something were to go wrong (cell phone service is spotty at best). The springs are remote, and fellow travelers far and few between. If coming from the Salt Lake City area, allow yourself at least 8 hours for the roundtrip journey. For detailed directions and information on Baker Hot Springs, please inquire at via email.

Delta, Utah

Location: Baker Hot Springs – Delta, Utah
Date: January 5, 2014